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6 Best Paints for a Gun

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Painting your gun can allow you to express yourself and have more diversity in how your firearm appears than others. Regardless, even if you are not someone who cares about cosmetic choices, painting your gun can also give you some tactical benefits. 

These benefits range from preventing rust to resisting general wear and tear. Be advised that specific core components of your gun are illegal to paint, so check your state’s regulations and laws before applying any paint.

Given that information, what is the best paint to use for a gun? There are quite a few to choose from, but we found the best ones are the ones mentioned below:

  • Duracoat ultimate firearms finish
  • Wheeler cerama coat spray-on ceramic coating
  • Rust-oleum specialty camouflage spray
  • Duracoat aerosol Kit
  • Krylon colormaster paint and primer
  • Dupli-color engine enamel with ceramic

This article discusses what exactly gun paint is, the best ones and why, and a few more frequently asked questions below. It is important to note that no matter what, look at state laws to ensure you follow the guidelines. With that being said, let us continue with the important stuff! 

What Is Gun Paint?

Gun paint is quite simply paint. It is applied to your gun to maintain functionality and look respectable and distinguished. The paint must also be strong enough to endure heat, regular usage and not chip and peel after a few quick uses, creating more of a mess than providing a benefit.

Restorations are also a significant portion of a gun paint’s versatility, as it can take even the most beaten, battered, and utilized guns and make them look pristine again. It is amazing for certain guns, but you would not want to do something similar to a wood stock classic like an M1 Garand, as it isn’t necessary and would steal the glory from an already beautiful weapon.

What Is the Best Paint to Use on a Gun?

The best paints you can use on a gun need to be durable. They need to hold up to heat (especially around the barrel) and offer some level of coloring to achieve your desired finish. To that end, these are the six best paints you can use on a gun.

1. Duracoat Ultimate Firearms Finish

Duracoat ultimate firearms finish brings the understanding that simplicity is best. Coming in a matte black finish, this no-nonsense paint gives your firearm a sleek look that can remain for up to four weeks. 

This paint also offers everything from UV protection to external damage resistance (within reason), and this paint works on wood, metal, and even plastic.

2. Wheeler Cerama Coat Spray-on Ceramic Coating

Next up is Wheeler cerama coat, and its claim to fame is a unique blend featuring a ceramic-infused component allowing it to offer some of the best durability out of a paint you can buy. 

The mixture itself will adhere to just about anything. The best part about this paint is that it is designed to protect your gun from scratching, chipping, and any solvents the gun may be exposed to, with the only downside truly being the baking process involved to make it work.

3. Rust-Oleum Specialty Camouflage Spray

If you want a camo finish, look no further than Rus-Oleum. With colors that will fit just about any environment you could be carrying in, this spray will keep you covered with a solid oil-based formula that gives you a non-reflective finish to remain undetected for longer. Still, you will need to get a primer on first.

4. Duracoat Aerosol Kit

Flexibility is what the design objective is with this paint, and coming from Duracoat you know you’ll be getting a quality product for your money. This Aerosol kit comes in many colors and is highly durable to boot.

The easy application method offered here also makes it a winner in just about any circle, with the biggest drawback on the product itself being the price, but you certainly will get what you pay for.

5. Krylon Colormaster Paint and Primer

Krylon makes its name on this list because it comes to the perfect median of affordability and overall function, as it is not expressly made to paint guns.

It still works quite well at the job it’s given, offering some excellent resistance to any weather it might have to endure and being easy to use. 

You can understand why it makes a notable mention here, and it’s an all-in-one, being both a paint and primer, making it viable on almost all surfaces, metal, plastic, wood, you name it.

6. Dupli-Color Engine Enamel With Ceramic

Yet another one-off kind of paint, but its entry is valid because it once again has a unique positioning using a ceramic-infused formula. This makes the paint adhere soundly to your gun of choice and is flexible enough to stick on most surfaces.

Another feather in its cap is that it is primarily made for automotive use, meaning it will not only resist oils but can endure some pretty hefty punishment from heat, perfect for areas that have the heat cranked up to 11.

What Should You Consider When Purchasing Gun Paint?

Your biggest concerns regarding gun paint usually boil down to how durable it is, how much you paid, and what it offers, but we’ll briefly go over the biggest factors below.

1. It Is Durable

If the paint allows your gun to last longer or take more punishment from you or the environment, it’s worth the cost.

2. Price

Gun paints can get quite expensive, especially with brands that have been in the game for quite some time. Still, these prices usually reflect quality, so try to find a good middle ground if you aren’t willing to spend a fortune.

3. Application Method

All paints are not created equally, so you may need a little more effort than a simple shake and spray to get the most out of your paint. Make sure to see the methods used in your paint before purchasing it. Some require a primer, while some require a little baking, so little research can go a long way.

4. Resistant to Heat

If your paint isn’t heat-resistant and you are in a hot area, you probably aren’t making the best investment possible. More importantly, this could damage your gun or make it a hassle to use. Always check what temperatures and limits your paints offer.

5. Different Finish

If you aim for a specific aesthetic with paint, carefully examine the finish offered with the paint you are using. Nothing is worse than ending up with a glossy finish on a gun you’ll be hunting with unless you like giving the paint a chance or yourself a challenge.

6. Formula

Different strokes for different folks is a true understanding. For paints, it boils down to a little more than that, as a formula using ceramic in it, for instance, will apply better and endure everything from impact to scratches better. Look for specific formulas if you are looking for paints that’ll stand up to some punishment.

7. Protection

It only makes sense that you should protect your firearm as much as it will protect or provide for you. Either way, taking time to ensure your gun won’t rust or endure unnecessary hardships will make taking care of it easier and keep it from letting you down sooner.

8. Adhesive

Cheap paints might not apply well to your gun, resulting in a finish that looks sloppy or lackluster or, in the worst of times, does not work at all. Double-check the paints you plan on buying to know for sure they will be able to apply properly to your gun.

9. Colors

Variety is the spice of life, and colors can say a lot about a gun’s owner. Regardless of whether you want paint that is practical in use or personal in style, options are always good.

Is It Okay to Spray Paint a Gun?

Yes, it is okay to spray-paint a gun. The kind of paint used will determine just how long the fresh coat of paint will last and what beneficial attributes you can gain from painting your gun in the first place.

Can You Spray Latex Paint With an Air Gun?

While this is seemingly out of topic, someone might ask this question, and because it is both paint and gun-related, you will get an answer. Technically speaking, yes, you can spray latex paint with an air gun. 

You can even use latex paint on a firearm, technically. Still, you wouldn’t be gaining anything outside of a gun with a different color on it, and possibly an nice cleanup job you’ll need to do, as latex paint will probably chip and peel due to exposure to the heat.

Can I Paint a Gun With Acrylic Paint

Once again, you can technically do anything you like to your firearm regarding painting. Still, the chemicals in the paint itself can damage the finish of the gun itself and make it a worse option for protection and general use, so it’s advised not to.

Final Words

You must check your state’s laws and regulations before painting or altering your firearm in any fashion, as ending up in jail or worse because you wanted to change the color of your gun is a silly position to be in. You also want to avoid damaging your gun by applying paint that doesn’t work well or worsens your gun’s function.

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